MOVE Mobility

 

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  1. Knowledge Exchange Programme for the government of Raparin Region, Kurdistan.

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    Our Knowledge Exchange Programme helps cities to visualize more sustainable options for their planning. This is really important in order to change the paradigm of the car-orientated regions such as Kurdistan and to set the first steps towards a Smart Moving Raparin.

    We shared with the governor, mayors and technicians our experiences on urbanism and sustainable mobility.

    Together with Nahuel Beccan from MAP Urban Strategies , Carolina Ramos carried out a workshop in which the challenges and possibilities of urban development and sustainable mobility for the cities of Rania and Chuar-Qurne were explored. The most demanding topics were land-use planning, road connections, the use of water in the city and in the agrarian zone, use of mountains for alternative energies, the increase of green areas and investment in infrastructure for tourism.

    The group visited various cities in the Netherlands, was introduced at the Dutch Cycling Embassy and made a cycling tour in Deventer.

     

  2. First cycle lane in Kampala now open

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    Smart Moving Kampala! was launched in 2014. In this project the NMT pilot route was designed in detail. Of course the first step was to design the city networks for car, BRT and bicycles. These networks are the every day blueprint for KCCA how and where to invest in infrastructure. Within a year the NMT pilot route will be implemented. Last month the first cycle lane was realised. Our partner in Uganda.

    Ms Amanda Ngabirano, was given the honor to open it. A small start on the move towards a fantastic end result!

    Many cities around the world (Nairobi, Singapore, Sidney, Brussels etc.) gave a reaction: Kampala is ahead of us!

     

  3. Redevelopment of Kajjansi market area

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    Kajjansi is a town in Wakiso District and nowadays integrated into the greater Kampala Metropolitan area. The Kajjansi area was always known for its market along the main connecting road from Kampala to Entebbe. Uganda’s rapid development (connection Airport Entebbe – capital Kampala) puts pressure on this area. Nowadays there is a lack of good quality housing, clean water, sanitation, reliable power supply, waste management, and adequate infrastructure for all modes.

    Field visits were undertaken and variety of stakeholder meetings took place focusing on spatial, mobility and inclusive business qualities, constraints and opportunities. In total over 30 organisations have actively contributed to the three development scenarios described in the Kajjansi Junction Report. The project is considered as a first step in a timeline that enables a phased operationalisation of an integrated spatial development strategy (Masterplan).